Pop-Culture vs. Science Analysis

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Pop-Culture vs. Science Analysis

In today’s modern society, there are different attitudes to marriage. Thus, some people oppose the idea of making relationships official because they believe that it is unreasonable and outdated. However, a significant amount of couples still decides to get married. This analysis will be devoted to the benefits of marriage. The paper will demonstrate that getting married is worth trying even today based on the analysis of both entertaining and scientific literature sources.

Pop Summary

Molly Triffin (n.d.) provides seven reasons that explain why people get married. First, official marriage adds substance to relationships. Second, couples receive the sense of security. They start to believe that they will stay together despite any difficulties. Third, partners become a team; particularly they create mutual goals and try to achieve them together. Besides, married couples feel more relaxed than unmarried ones because they have reached the last stage of commitment. Molly Triffin also states that marriage is a good way to demonstrate a partner that he/she is special. In addition, there are practical benefits of marriage such as paying together for social or medical security as well as getting support in childcare even after divorce. Finally, married couples start to have a more intensive sexual life than before making their relationships official.

Scholarly Summary

Kelly Musick and Larry Bumpass (2012) provide a study on how marriage and cohabitation affect the well-being of couples. Their research indicates that marriages and cohabitation have similar impacts on the well-being, health, and social links. For example, the married and cohabiting have almost the same levels of depression and spend almost the same amount of time with their friends and parents. The differences between these two kinds of unions appear over some time due to the higher instability of cohabitation. Beside, people that form unions are happier at the beginning of their relationships than over some time. Overall, the scientists found that marriages and cohabitation improve psychosocial state and health but reduce the social connections.

Hilke Brockmann and Thomas Klein (2004) performed an event history analysis, which demonstrates the impact of marriage on mortality risks. In particular, the researchers studied 12,484 participants of both genders. It was determined that men are more affected by their marital status than women are. Besides, the scientists found that the protection from death risks depends on the duration of a marriage. Women tend to save survival benefits from prior marriages for a longer time than men do. Moreover, they forget about survival disadvantages caused by divorce or husband’s deaths faster than males.

Greg J. Dunkan and his colleagues (2006) analyze the effects of first marriage and cohabitation on binge drinking, marijuana consumption, and smoking. The research was based on the findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Thus, they concluded that risks behaviors of participants  reduced after union formation. At the same time, men demonstrated a greater response to the events than women did. The marriage had more impact than cohabitation. On the other hand, the positive changes were noticed only with marijuana and alcohol. Smoking was not affected by union formation.

Kei M. Nomaguchi and Suzanne M. Bianchi (2004) analyzed the impact of marriage, parenthood and work on exercise time of females aged 18-64. The research was based on findings from the 1995 National Health Interview Survey. The scientists determined that married women spent less time on sport than unmarried ones. Having children (under five years old) also reduced the exercise time. The employment also decreased the time spent on sport, but its effects were less significant.  In general, females spent less time on doing exercise than men. However, employment, parenthood, and marriage had a more negative effect on exercise time of males than females.

Evaluation

Kelly Musick and Larry Bumpass (2012) prove that psychological well-being of married couples is better than of unmarried ones. This assumption corresponds with Triffin’s idea that marriage makes partners feel more relaxed and safer. Hilke Brockmann and Thomas Klein (2004) found that married people live longer than single ones. This conclusion also agrees with the Triffin’s article because reducing mortality risks means that people feel happier after making relationships official. The research of Greg J.Dunkan and his colleagues (2006) revealed the positive impact of marriage and cohabitation on risk behaviors because of people feeling safer and relaxed. Overall, all these scholarly articles prove the claim of Molly Triffin’s about the improvement of the psychosocial well-being after getting married.

On the other hand, the article of Kei M. Nomaguchi and Suzanne M. Bianchi (2004) slightly contradicts Molly Triffin’s analysis. Thus, Triffin states that married people start to work as a team and create mutual aims based on the interests of each other. The research of Nomaguchi and Bianchi found that marriage reduces the exercise time of partners differently. It means that one of the partners (usually a man) needs to sacrifice his/her exercise time and health for the well-being of the family.

In conclusion, magazine and scholar articles prove that marriage and cohabitation have a positive impact on the psychosocial well-being of partners. It leads to reducing mortality risks and risky behaviors (alcohol and marijuana use). However, marriage reduces exercise time, which could negatively affect the health of the individuals. In addition, exercise time of partners reduces differently, which contradicts the Triffan’s idea of working as a team.

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